Omaha Poker Rules

How to Play Omaha Poker
and Omaha Hi-Lo Poker
Back to Card Game Rules
Back to Card Game Rules
(If you are unfamiiar with poker terminology, click here to find out what each word means)
                          Omaha Poker
Similar to both Omaha Hi/Lo Poker and Texas Hold'em, Omaha Poker requires its 2 to 10 Players to create the best five-card combination from a total of nine cards - the strongest combination winning the pot. As the nine cards are made up of four pocket cards and five community cards, the resulting combinations are stronger than those in other Poker games.

1.  The Players to the left of the Dealer begin the game by posting blind bets. The Player on the Dealer's left posts a small blind bet, and the Player on the Small Blind's left posts a big blind bet.

Note: The Dealer's position at the table changes after every game. The dealer button (D) shows the Dealer's position at the table.

2.  Four pocket cards are dealt to each Player.

3.  In the first round, the Player to the Big Blind's left plays first and can either:

Fold
Bet
Raise

Note: In the first round betting is capped at one bet and three raises per Player.

4.  In the second round, three community cards are dealt. This is called the Flop. A round of betting follows and Players can either:

Check
Fold
Call
Raise

5.  In the third round, a fourth community card is dealt. This is called the Turn. Another round of betting follows.

6.  In the fourth round a fifth and final community card is dealt. This is called the River Card. The final round of betting follows. The remaining Players then use two of their pocket cards and three of the community cards to create the best five-card high hand possible.

Important: Winning hands must consist of two pocket cards and three community cards.

Tips

To improve your chances of winning, use the following strategies:

Watch out for the low cards. You are looking for a high hand only.
As there are five community cards to choose from, Straights and Flushes are common.
                          Omaha Hi/Lo Poker
A variation of Texas Hold'em, Omaha Hi/Lo Poker splits the pot equally between the best high card hand winner and the best low card hand winner. With 2 to 10 Players per hand, Omaha Hi/Lo is unique in that it allows those Players that tie on either a high or low hand to share the winnings, thus quartering the pot.
1. The Players to the left of the Dealer begin the game by posting blind bets. The Player on the Dealer's left posts a small blind bet, and the Player on the Small Blind's left posts a big blind bet.

Note: The Dealer's position at the table changes after every game. The dealer button (D) shows the Dealer's position at the table.

2.  Four pocket cards are dealt to each Player.

3.  In the first round, the Player to the Big Blind's left plays first and can either:

Fold
Bet
Raise

Also Note: In the first round, betting is capped at one bet and three raises per Player.

4.  In the second round, three community cards are dealt. This is called the Flop. A round of betting follows and Players can either:

Check
Fold
Call
Raise

5.  In the third round, a fourth community card is dealt. This is called the Turn. Another round of betting follows.

6.  In the fourth round a fifth and final community card is dealt. This is called the River Card. The final round of betting follows. The remaining Players then use two of their pocket cards and three of the community cards to create the best five-card low and five-card high hand possible. The two Players with the best high and low hands split the pot.

Important:
Winning hands must consist of two pocket cards and three community cards. Low hands can only win if all the cards in the hand have a value of 8 or less.
Note:
It is not always possible to create both a low hand and a high hand. Sometimes you can only play for either the high hand or the low hand.
It is possible to win the entire pot by having both the highest and lowest hands.
If you and another Player tie on a hand, you both win a quarter of the pot. This is known as the pot being quartered.
Example:

Player A wins the high hand and Players B and C tie for the low hand. The pot is $100. Player A receives $50 and Players B and C receive $25 each.

Tips

To improve your chances of winning, use the following strategies:

A Pair is more of a restriction than a help if one of the pair is a community card of the same value as one of your private, low cards. This means that your hidden card does not give you a low hand advantage.
When there are less than four Players at the table, you still lose money if the pot is quartered.
You must decide quickly if you are eligible to play for the low hand, and adjust your betting accordingly.
If you have a strong high hand after the flop, it is advisable to play aggressively through to the end. This ensures you have a good chance of winning half the pot.
Play Poker Rush and Royal Flush Now
Two great poker games that are fun to play for fun or real cash.  US based and LEGAL!
Find a gift for that special cardplayer
Find a gift for that special cardplayer
Tired of Losing at the Race Track or OTB???
Whether you're playing the dogs or horses, winning is a process.  You can't depend upon luck.  You need a good system for winning.  Good racing systems don't just happen.  They are built by people who have played the game and understand it well.  We have enlisted two seasoned professionals with inside information to build the best racing and betting systems to make you a winner.

Now here is the very best and also most important part.
Every horse racing system or dog racing system we sell has a full money back guarantee with no questions asked.

That's right, no questions asked.  You will never find a more  honest or fairer offer than this.

If you are tired of losing and want to be a winner, get a good system you can trust and start learning how insiders make money every day at the track.

Horse Racing Systems
(horse racing handicapping systems)

Dog Racing Systems
(greyhound handicapping systems)

Not only will you find great systems on these two sites, but you'll also find free helpful articles by the people who created these systems